Georgia Genealogical Society seeks support for the Archives

A few short months ago, the Georgia Archives was in deep trouble. Through the efforts of archivists, librarians, historians, genealogists, and others across the country, the Archives was saved. Though the doors are no longer in danger of closing, the Archives is not quite out of the fire yet. Due to the budget issues, the Georgia Archives is unable to provide all of the services it might like.

The Georgia Genealogical Society recently made the following announcement:

The 2014 project is to support educational programs at the Archives by funding a part time employee to develop and implement educational programs at the Archives. By action of the GGS Board, we have added a line item to our budget to receive funds for this project. It reads “GGS Georgia Archives Education Fund.” All funds donated specifically to this line item will be given to the Georgia Archives. The Director has stated that in 2014 this would be used to hire a part time employee to develop and implement educational programs at the Archives, upgrade educational facilities, and provide educational materials.

If you wish to contribute to this project, checks should be made payable to Georgia Genealogical Society, with “Archives Education Fund” in the notes section, and mailed to Georgia Genealogical Society, Post Office Box 550247, Atlanta, Georgia 30355-2747. GGS is a 501C3 organization and a letter of donation will be provided for tax purposes. It is our plan to present a check to the Archives on our 50th Anniversary, 3 June 2014, and another at the end of 2014. This opportunity to support the Archives is open to everyone, not just GGS members.

As a member of the Georgia Genealogical Society, I plan to contribute to this project. If you are able, I hope you will also consider doing so.

Online State Resources for Genealogy e-book version 3.0 now available!

I am pleased to announce that my popular ebook Online State Resources for Genealogy has once again been updated, and version 3.0 is now available for purchase.

The Online State Resources for Genealogy ebook was originally released in January 2011, containing links to online record indexes and images. Unlike many resource guides the focus of this ebook is on those websites that contain record indexes and images but are not genealogy-based sites. You will not find references to Ancestry.comFamilySearchU. S. GenWeb, or Find-A-Grave.

Instead you will find links to resources found on the websites of state and county archives, county clerks, historical societies and museums, university libraries, public libraries, and others. These sites contain many records that have never been previously digitized or made available online. Many of these have never even been microfilmed.

In its 1,100+ pages, Version 3.0 provides information for over 600 repositories, containing over 9,000 links!

In addition to the new links, all of the previously listed links have been verified and updated when necessary. I have also introduced two new chapters to accompany the individual state chapters, focusing on National and Regional sites.

I would also like to announce the debut of a companion blog, also entitled Online State Resources for Genealogy. This blog will explore one or two individual resources from the book each week. Subscribe at http://onlinestateresources.wordpress.com and expect the first post in the next few days.

To purchase version 3.0 of Online State Resources for Genealogy, visit http://haitfamilyresearch.com/onlineStates.htm.

Finding a house in the UK census

There’s little worse than looking for a family in a census and not finding them. Especially when you have other records, and you know exactly where they were living at the time. I recently experienced this again while searching for a family in the 1851 census of England.

James Farmer, his wife Nabby, and at least a few still-unmarried daughters and an infant son should have all been living somewhere in Wigan, Lancashire. Yet the family did not appear in the indexes to these records on FamilySearch, Ancestry.com, or FindMyPast.com. On each site I tried numerous variations, “soundex” settings, wildcards . . . with and without birthdates, with and without surnames, with and without given names. Nothing worked.

I knew that the family was living in Scholes. The birth registration for a son born in 1848 reported their address at that time as Wellington Street.[1] I looked at a map of Wigan and found Wellington Street. I read the enumeration district descriptions on the first page of the census for each nearby district and thought I had found where Wellington Street was likely to have been enumerated. Yet I did a page-by-page search of these districts and still no Farmer family.

Finally, I solved the problem using an online finding aid provided by the National Archives [UK]: the Historical Streets Project.[2]

For each census from 1841 through 1901, the Historical Streets Project provides a listing for each street within each registration district. You will need to know the district in which the street lay in order to browse directly for the appropriate street, though it is also possible to use the wiki search engine to find references to the street name. Each street listing identifies a nearby street, and, more importantly, the NA reference number and folio of that street’s enumeration.

To find the Farmer family, I simply had to go to the street index for the 1851 census, focus on the Wigan registration district, and look for Wellington Street. The Historical Street Project revealed that the street was enumerated on HO 107/2199, folio 252–257. The reference “HO 107/2199″ corresponds to several enumeration districts within Wigan. Folios 252–257 appear in enumeration district 1I in Wigan. Looking through these six pages was quite simple, and the family appeared exactly where they should have![3]

Interestingly enough, the handwriting on the entry is quite clear. I am still not sure why none of the online indexes contained this Farmer family by name.

SOURCES:

[1] England, birth certificate for James Farmer, b. 6 October 1848; citing Volume 21, page 763, entry 372, Wigan Union registration district, County Lancaster; General Register Office, Southport.

[2] “Your Archives:Historical Streets Project,” The National Archives, Your Archives (http://yourarchives.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php?title=Your_Archives:Historical_Streets_Project : accessed 4 November 2013).

[3] 1851 U. K. Census, Lancashire, Wigan Borough and Township, St. Catherine’s Ecclesiastical District, folio 257 (stamped, verso), page 31, household 105, Wellington St., James Farmer household; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 November 2013); citing Class HO107, Piece 2199.

NGS seeks nominations for the 2014 Genealogy Hall of Fame

The following announcement was received from the National Genealogical Society:

Would your society like to honor a genealogist whose exemplary work lives on today? Perhaps there was a notable genealogist in your state or county whose name should be memorialized in the NGS Hall of Fame.

If so, the National Genealogical Society would like to hear from you. NGS is seeking nominations from the entire genealogical community for persons whose achievements or contributions have made an impact on the field. This educational program increases appreciation of the high standards advocated and achieved by committed genealogists whose work paved the way for researchers today.

Since 1986 when Donald Lines Jacobus became the first genealogist elected to the National Genealogy Hall of Fame, twenty‐five outstanding genealogists have been recognized for their contributions. The 2012 honoree will join this select group of distinguished members. This year’s selection, and the society that honored the nominee, will be feted at the 2014 NGS Family History Conference to be held 7-10 May 2014 in Richmond, Virginia. Nominations for election to the Hall of Fame are made by genealogical societies and historical societies throughout the United States.

Guidelines for nominations:

  • A nominee must have been actively engaged in genealogy in the United States for at least ten years, must have been deceased for at least five years at the time of nomination, and must have made contributions to the field of genealogy judged to be of lasting significance in ways that were unique, pioneering, or exemplary.
  • The National Genealogy Hall of Fame is an educational project in which the entire genealogical community is invited to participate. Affiliation with the National Genealogical Society is not required.
  • The National Genealogy Hall of Fame Committee elects one person to the Hall of Fame annually. Those elected are permanently commemorated in the Hall of Fame at Society headquarters, Arlington, Virginia.
  • Nominations for election to the Hall of Fame are due by 31 January each year. Official nomination forms are available from our website, www.ngsgenealogy.org, Awards & Competitions, or by contacting the National Genealogical Society, 3108 Columbia Pike, Suite 300, Arlington, VA 22204‐4304; phone 1‐800‐473‐0060.

SLIG 2014 Early-Bird registration ends on October 31, 2013!

The following press release was received from the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy:

SLIG’s Early-Bird Registration ends on October 31, 2013! Ensure you get yourself a spot in one of the few remaining courses. The following courses still have seats left:

· American Research and Records: Focus on Families

This intermediate level course covers 19th-21st century U.S. records and strategies beyond the basics with a specific emphasis on researching families and individuals. Don’t miss a chance to spend a week with nationally known instructors Josh Taylor, from the Genealogy Roadshow; Debra Mieszala, CG; and Paula Stuart-Warren, CG. This course is certain to help you break down those brick walls!

· Credentialing: Accreditation, Certification, or Both?

Accreditation or certification? This course will explore both options. The topics will guide you through the processes of applying and determining which one (or both) are right for you. Spend a week with credentialed instructors who provide expert guidance and advice and who are available to answer your questions.

· Researching in Eastern Europe

Millions of people immigrated to North America leaving family and generations of ancestors behind in Eastern Europe. Descendants find it hard to trace their origins due to foreign languages, difficult records and multiple changes in the political landscape. This course brings together several of the most successful Eastern Europe genealogists to teach you the important information you need to succeed in such complex research.

· Advanced Evidence Analysis Practicum

This hands-on course is an opportunity for advanced genealogist to put their research skills into practice. Participants will work on at least five complex genealogical research problems—a new one each day. There is nothing like directed case studies and practice to further your genealogical knowledge and expertise.

· Problem Solving

Have a brick wall in your research? This unique course is tailored to your individual research needs! Enhance your problem solving skills while working on your personal research project for a particular ancestor or ancestral couple. Don’t miss the opportunity to spend a week dedicated to researching your family!

· Utilizing Social History

This exciting new course–offered for the first time in 2014–is designed to help you put the flesh on the bones of your ancestors and bring them to life. No longer is genealogy about simply listing the begets, it is about telling your ancestor’s story.

Immerse yourself in a specific genealogical topic for a week-long educational opportunity that is unparalleled. Many of the courses are interactive and highlight on site research at the Family History Library (FHL) as well as one-on-one consultations with the course coordinators and instructors. These individuals are genealogical experts and provide guidance and insight that may help you overcome those brick walls and move forward with your research.

Attendees have time to explore Salt Lake City’s many attractions as well as spend time outside of the course researching at the FHL. The library is a short walk from the Institute’s location and, if available, the Radisson often provides shuttle service to the library.

Another benefit of joining SLIG this year is the ability to attend the Association of Professional Genealogist’s Professional Management Conference (PMC), which will be held the Friday and Saturday before the Institute begins. You can experience two great events being held back-to-back at one location!

Sign-up before October 31st and you will save over 10% off your registration. Become a member of UGA and increase your savings even more. The registration page can be accessed at http://www.infouga.org/aem.php?lv=r&eid=8. More information on each of the tracks can be accessed at http://www.infouga.org/aem.php?lv=p&epg=51.

 

–Debra Hoffman

SLIG Publicity Chair

What’s up?

When I started this year I didn’t intend that my blog would go silent. I thought it would be business-as-usual, with at least a good though-provoking post every so often. Sadly, as the year went on, the posts got less and less frequent.

Rest assured, though, I am not disappearing—just reorganizing my priorities. I will try to continue to post as much as I can, but my efforts in the field of genealogy are being refocused.

Among some of the things I have been working on this year:

  • I taught at three major institutes, the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (in January), the Institute of Genealogical and Historical Research (in June), and the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (in July).
  • I have written several articles published in various journals: two in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (December 2012 and March 2013), one in the Maryland Genealogical Society Journal, and one in Chinook, the magazine of the Alberta Family Histories Society. Several other articles have been written and are pending publication, one of which even (gasp) involves research into my own family. Even more articles are in various stages of completion.
  • I have been assisting with the creation of the Southern Appalachians Genealogical Association. I am serving as Editor of the annual Journal. If any of my readers have an interest in the Southern Appalachians region, please join the society and consider writing for the Journal. The call for submissions is posted on their website.
  • You may have seen me on the Chris O’Donnell episode of Who Do You Think You Are? That was fun. I am also credited (though I do not appear on-screen) for my research in the Christina Applegate episode.
  • I have continued to serve my term on the Board of Directors for the Association of Professional Genealogists. I also served as Chapter Representative of Greater Philadelphia Area chapter of APG, helping with the chapter’s organization and incorporation into the APG—a process now complete! Unfortunately I will be stepping down from both of these positions next year.
  • This month, I was elected to a three-year term on the Board of Trustees of the Board for Certification of Genealogists. I am looking forward to being able to contribute what I can in this position.
  • Supplementing my genealogical activities, I have also been taking several online courses to continue my own education in several subjects. Some of these relate indirectly to my work in genealogy; some do not. You may soon witness the incorporation of some of these topics into my educational offerings.
  • There are a few other projects I have been working on as well, but I am not at liberty to tell you about them yet. As soon as I can tell you, I will.

You might notice some trends.

When I first began my career as a professional genealogist, I wanted to focus on two things: writing/publishing and promoting higher standards for research. Over the years, in not wanting to turn down opportunities, I became involved in other endeavors. I spread myself too thin. So this year I decide to reassess my career goals, and have been moving away from anything that did not further my goals. My new activities will (hopefully) continue to reflect these goals.

Be patient with me. I plan to soon regain some semblance of balance in posting to the blog. I may not post as often as I once did, but it should be more often than it has been recently.

Michael

U. S. Genealogy Writer’s Market

19 August 2013

Dear Genealogy Periodical Editors:

How do genealogical authors find your publication?

Genealogy periodicals—from popular magazines to state and national journals to the newsletters of local genealogical societies—are vital to the genealogy community.

Among other vital roles, periodicals

  • educate genealogists about records and research methodology;
  • enable genealogists with similar research interests to communicate with each other;
  • share local, national, and international news of concern to genealogists; and
  • allow researchers to publish the fruits of their research efforts.

Despite this central position in the genealogy community, there exists no central resource bringing together all of the genealogy periodicals published in the United States.

To do this we plan to publish the first U. S. Genealogy Writer’s Market in early 2014. This book will list basic details about genealogy periodicals, so that genealogical researchers and prospective writers can quickly and easily locate their ideal publishing markets.

In order to do this we need your help—just fill out the short online questionnaire at this address:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/GWM-Editors

Please feel free to alert other editors to this project. If you have any questions or comments, please contact either of us at our respective emails.

Harold Henderson, CG

librarytraveler@gmail.com

Michael Hait, CG

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