Archive for the ‘Notable Genealogy Blog Posts’ Category

Notable Genealogy Blog Posts, 15 April 2012

The following recent blog posts are those that I consider important or notable. Unlike other similar blog lists, I cannot guarantee that they will all be from the past week. (Some weeks I simply do not have time to read any blogs.) But I will try to write this on a fairly regular basis.

Kimberly Powell, “Citations Explained – A Don’t Miss Resource For All Genealogists,” About.com Genealogy blog, posted 3 April 2012 (http://genealogy.about.com : accessed 6 April 2012).

Jay Fonkert, CG, “Sources and Cargo Ships,” Four Generation Genealogy blog, posted 9 April 2012 (http://fourgenerationsgenealogy.blogspot.com : accessed 11 April 2012). Jay uses a perfect metaphor to distinguish between sources and information.

Notable Genealogy Blog Posts, 1 April 2012

The following recent blog posts are those that I consider important or notable. Unlike other similar blog lists, I cannot guarantee that they will all be from the past week. (Some weeks I simply do not have time to read any blogs.) But I will try to write this on a fairly regular basis.

Tonia Kendrick, “Pedigree Analysis: Start With What You Know,” Tonia’s Roots blog, posted 23 March 2012 (http://www.toniasroots.net : accessed 29 March 2012). Tonia demonstrates a method that we should all be using, in one form or another, to help break down those brickwalls. I especially like the way she lays it out.

Nick Barratt, “What we want from our genealogy world,” The Family History Show blog, posted 26 March 2012 (http://www.familyhistoryshow.net : accessed 29 March 2012). I include this post for two main reasons: (1) Nick notes that there are possible issues with changing records access laws even in other countries (the show is based in the UK). (2) It raises an interesting question, namely, “what one thing would you change about the genealogy sector today?” Please feel free to leave your responses in the comments to this post.

Kassie Nelson, “Five Lessons From a Transitional Genealogist,” Cedar Tree Genealogy blog, posted 27 March 2012 (http://cedartree.blog.com : accessed 29 March 2012). After I discovered this blog (see above), Kassie posted this. I highly recommend that anyone interested in transitioning into a career of genealogy subscribe to her blog. This post discusses some of the lessons that Kassie has learned with her first four clients.

Notable Genealogy Blog Posts, 25 March 2012

The following recent blog posts are those that I consider important or notable. Unlike other similar blog lists, I cannot guarantee that they will all be from the past week. (Some weeks I simply do not have time to read any blogs.) But I will try to write this on a fairly regular basis.

Short list this week, as I am still catching up on my reading…

Andrew Simpson, “The little bits, spelling and alphabetization,” A Linguist’s Guide to Genealogy blog, posted 1 March 2012 (http://linguistgenealogist.blogspot.com : accessed 24 March 2012). I love when people bring their studies in other fields into their genealogy research. Though I am not a linguist in any sense, it is a subject that intrigues me, and this blog will surely provide a lot of fare for me. This particular post discusses some of the prepositions from other languages that become americanized as parts of surnames. (The best example may be U. S. President Martin Van Buren.)

Two other posts are not genealogy-related, but I thought people might be interested:

Carol Fisher Saller, “Citing a Tweet (It’s Not Just for Twits),” The Subversive Copy Editor blog, posted 23 March 2012 (http://www.subversivecopyeditor.com/blog/ : accessed 24 March 2012). We might as well learn how to do this now. :)

Mike Parkinson, “How to Communicate with Aliens,” BDG Blog, posted 21 March 2012 (http://billiondollargraphics.blogspot.com : accessed 24 March 2012). This post describes the plaque on the Pioneer 10 satellite that was sent to Jupiter in the 1970s. It is a fascinating exploration of visual language.

Notable Genealogy Blog Posts, 12 March 2012

The following recent blog posts are those that I consider important or notable. Unlike other similar blog lists, I cannot guarantee that they will all be from the past week. (Some weeks I simply do not have time to read any blogs.) But I will try to write this on a fairly regular basis.

The Narrator (pseudonym), “Tuesday’s Tip – Interpreting primary sources – the 6 ‘w’s,” Essex Voices Past blog, posted 21 February 2012 and “Tuesday’s Tip: Primary sources – ‘Unwitting Testimony’,” Essex Voices Past blog, posted 28 February 2012 (http://www.essexvoicespast.com : accessed 5 March 2012). These two articles are geared more towards historians than genealogists, but they discuss important aspects of interpreting the records we use: basically understanding what the document says, and what it means (but doesn’t say).

Harold Henderson, “How to prove parents without direct evidence,” Midwestern Microhistory blog, posted 8 March 2012 (http://midwesternmicrohistory.blogspot.com : accessed 9 March 2012). In this enlightening post, Harold dissects the evidence and the proof argument of a case study in a recent issue of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly.

Daniel Hubbard, “Learning and Imagining,” Personal Past Meditations blog, posted 4 March 2012 (http://www.thepersonalpast.com/blog/ : accessed 9 March 2012). Daniel discusses breaking the rules of genealogy, particularly the one about starting with yourself and moving methodically back in time.

Notable Genealogy Blog Posts, 4 March 2012

The following recent blog posts are those that I consider important or notable. Unlike other similar blog lists, I cannot guarantee that they will all be from the past week. (Some weeks I simply do not have time to read any blogs.) But I will try to write this on a fairly regular basis.

Malissa Ruffner, “Treasure Hunt – Using the WPA/HRS Index,” Family Epic blog, posted 14 February 2012 (http://familyepic.posterous.com/ : accessed 29 February 2012). I was immediately drawn to this post because it discusses the recent resurrection of the Baltimore City Archives in Maryland. (I can remember several years ago when the old Baltimore City Archives was closed because of poor archival conditions.) But Malissa also discusses a name index for Baltimore City created by the Works Progress Administration during the Depression. Do researchers in other areas know of other similar indexes?

Malissa Ruffner, “(Loose) Paper Chase,” Family Epic blog, posted 21 February 2012 (http://familyepic.posterous.com/ : accessed 29 February 2012). Another great post from Malissa! This one contains the trifecta: slave research, research in loose court papers, and researching historic laws.

Brenda Joyce Jerome, CG, “Free or Slave?,” Western Kentucky Genealogy Blog, posted 16 February 2012 (http://wkygenealogy.blogspot.com : accessed 3 March 2012). Ms. Jerome discusses an example of a “certificate of freedom” in Kentucky, granted to a free black man born to a white woman. As she reports, the status of children followed the status of their mother, so anyone born to a free woman was also therefore free. This is a seldom-mentioned law that existed throughout most of the country.

James Tanner, “Distance — a misunderstood concept,” Genealogy’s Star blog, posted 29 February 2012 (http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com : accessed 3 March 2012). In this post, Mr. Tanner describes the importance of physical distance (rather than political boundaries) and travel time in researching our ancestors.

And I also must mention two blogs that exemplify the possibilities of how blogs can be used to educate and demonstrate key genealogical skills:

Rachal Mills Lennon, M.A., CG: Finding Southern Ancestors at http://www.findingsouthernancestors.com/blog1.html. Ms. Lennon uses case studies to explore advanced research methods, particularly the “FAN Club” (family, associates, neighbors) principle or “cluster genealogy.”

Margaret G. Waters: Orangeburgh Plats: Orangeburgh District, South Carolina Land Records at http://orangeburghplats.com/category/blog/. Ms. Waters has been platting early surveys in Orangeburgh District, South Carolina, using topographic maps. If you are researching in this area, this site is an essential resource. Even if you are not researching in this area, the examples set and methodology used by Ms. Waters will help.

Notable Genealogy Blog Posts, 26 February 2012

The following recent blog posts are those that I consider important or notable. Unlike other similar blog lists, I cannot guarantee that they will all be from the past week. (Some weeks I simply do not have time to read any blogs.) But I will try to write this on a fairly regular basis.

Kathryn Lake Hogan, “Why Should You Hire a Professional Genealogist?,” Looking4Ancestors blog, posted 22 February 2012 (http://www.looking4ancestors.com/ : accessed 25 February 2012). Kathryn explores issues surrounding the hiring of a professional genealogist, including why hiring a professional might be necessary and how much one might expect to pay (in Canadian dollars).

James Tanner, “Lessons in Genealogy from 1915 Part One,” and “Lessons in Genealogy from 1915 Part Two,” Genealogy’s Star blog, posted 20 February 2012 (http://genealogysstar.blogspot.com/ : accessed 24 February 2012). Mr. Tanner explores a book on genealogy methodology published by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints back in 1915. I am a big fan of genealogical history and historiography, and have downloaded the book from Internet Archive for my own exploration.

Judy G. Russell, CG, “Certified, yes; certifiable… well…,” The Legal Genealogist blog, posted 25 February 2012 (http://www.legalgenealogist.com/blog : accessed 25 February 2012). A very humorous look at Judy’s voyage to earning her shiny new credential from the Board for the Certification of Genealogists. Be sure to go congratulate her!

Notable Genealogy Blog Posts, 19 February 2012

The following recent blog posts are those that I consider important or notable. Unlike other similar blog lists, I cannot guarantee that they will all be from the past week. (Some weeks I simply do not have time to read any blogs.) But I will try to write this on a fairly regular basis.

Kimberly Powell, “Search for Sources, Not Just Surnames,” About.com Genealogy blog, posted 29 January 2012 (http://genealogy.about.com : accessed 17 February 2012). Kimberly discusses the importance of educating yourself about what records are available that might be relevant to your research at every level of government.

Daniel Hubbard, “Footnotes on my Footnotes,” Personal Past Meditations: A Genealogy Blog, posted 12 February 2012 (http://www.thepersonalpast.com : accessed 14 February 2012). In this post, Daniel discusses the need to understand the provenance of the sources you are using.

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